Friday, November 6, 2015

Raptors Poetic – Of Ojai, Eagles and Owls


Birds of Prey. Sounds pretty cool. But what does it actually mean?
“Raptors” is a word given wider accessibility because of Jurassic Park when the clever thinking raptor dinosaurs decided to attack the humans killing that Australian dude. That notwithstanding, raptors are actually birds of prey, meaning they eat meat. Yes, some birds are vegetarians, but for raptors, meat is what’s for dinner. The official definition: A raptor is a bird of prey that uses its sharp talons to catch and kill live animals. The word raptor comes from the Latin word rapere which means “to snatch or grab.” According to the Ojai Raptor Center people often group Vultures into this category but they are not genetically related (the birds, not the people), and do not hunt live prey.

The Ojai Raptor Center (ORC) opens their doors to the public twice yearly and it is a fantastic chance to see these rehabilitated birds up close, within a few feet actually, and marvel at the stunning grace, agility, beauty and all around wonder of these birds. I recently visited, and the next time they open up, you should too.

The fee is a mere $5 per person, about the cost of a lame Starbucks coffee drink – and you get way more. The ORC is housed in what used to be an honor farm – a place for juvenile delinquents - and now is home to multiple non-profits, of which ORC holds a great place with open aviaries, a small theatre, a Kids Corner and a stage. There are bird pelts (which you can touch), live birds, and eggs on display and this is meant to be a place of wonder, a place to connect with the best of nature and remind ourselves that we as humans, though probably smarter and more able to use logic, pale in comparison to the sheer beauty and jaw dropping efficient design of these birds who actually have to hunt for their food, not sit at a drive-thru. 
All of the birds at ORC are birds that have suffered some injury and are being rehabilitated in Ojai, given new life and a reimagined purpose. What’s great is that each bird has a name and the caretaker for that bird, perched on their gloved hand, knows virtually everything about their bird. No, you can’t pet them (again, the birds, not the people), but you can get closer than you ever could in the wild.
You’ll see owls, falcons, eagles, vultures and other very cool birds. It’s a great place for kids though many of the adults were as transfixed as the kids were. So remind yourself that we share this planet with other species and that we have an obligation, since we sit atop the food chain, to protect, safeguard and treat well all other species. In doing so we become better animals ourselves. A visit is not an all day occurrence, and it’s a 10-minute drive to Ojai, and you’re right near Casitas Lake for fishing or boating, so fly up to Ojai and prepare to be amazed. 
The wingspans on some birds is bigger than me!

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